Tag Archives: art show

This Artist’s Life, #5: Purple Trees and Blue Ladies

“Strength in Blue” sold at KORE Gallery back in the spring. Oil Pastel, 20×24 inches by Susan E. Brooks

“Color is my day-long obsession, joy and torment.” ~ Claude Monet

Someone was looking at my painting the other day and asked,

“Why is the tree purple?”

“I feel like most trees should be purple,” I replied, and I don’t really know why this is true.

Experimenting with color is part of the mystery and the magic of creating art for me.   I realize that most trees are gray or brown, but in those grays and browns, I see shades of violet, and blue, and pink, or at least the light seems to suggest those colors to my mind.

I love color, and most of the artists I admire used color in creative ways.  Monet used all kinds of unexpected colors: he painted orange haystacks, blue and orange cathedrals, and if you look at his series of Poplars, even purple trees.  Mary Cassatt used blues and greens and violets in her flesh tones with beautiful effects.  Picasso had his blue period–maybe this is my purple period.

It is fascinating to me to see the unique styles of various artists.  I hope you can come out to the Portland Art and Heritage Fair this Saturday to see the many different interpretations of the the theme, “Life on the River.”  Mine will be the oil pastel painting of the river with the purple trees.

This Artist’s Life, #4: The Extravagance of Creation

A View of the Ohio at the 14th St. Bridge, 18×24,
oil pastel on paper, by Susan E. Brooks

“Looking at God’s creation, it is pretty clear that the creator itself did not know where to stop.  There is not one pink flower, or even fifty pink flowers, but hundreds.  Snowflakes, of course, are the ultimate exercise in sheer creative glee.  No two alike.  This creator looks suspiciously like someone who just might send us support for our creative adventures.”

–from The Artist’s Way, by Julia Cameron

I love that quote by Julia Cameron, and I hope my landscapes celebrate the extravagance of the Creator.

This week I am delivering an oil pastel landscape painting of the Ohio River to be shown at the Portland Art & Heritage Fair.  Click here for info about the Portland Art and Heritage Fair.  I am honored to be a part of this exhibition about the Ohio River at the Portland Museum on September 28.  I hope you can come out for a fun day of activities for the family and see the exhibition.

 

This Artist’s Life, #3: Picasso or Warhol, Striking a Balance

“The Sudanese General” is on display at KORE Gallery until until Sept. 14. Oil pastel on paper, 24×18 inches, by Susan E. Brooks

Maybe I should destroy my art work if I don’t like it.  I heard that Picasso slashed some of his paintings into shreds with his palette knife because they didn’t measure up to his standards for himself (1).

I’m not quite as intense as Picasso, but I’m also not quite as relaxed as Andy Warhol, though I aspire to be.  He’s what he said:

“Don’t think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art” (2).

This month I am showing my art work in two different group exhibitions in Louisville, Kentucky, and it’s always inspiring to me to see the work of so many different artists.

Looking at all of the art work on display, I sometimes wonder how other artists choose what to submit for these invitational juried exhibitions.  (Artists send photos of their work to the gallery and hope to be accepted into the show.)

“An African Madonna” is  on display at the Tim Faulkner Gallery for the month of September.  By Susan E. Brooks, 20 x 30 inches, oil pastel on mat board.

I have three categories of work, at least.  Work that I love, work I’m unsure about, and work that I don’t like.  I have a closet full of such pieces, work that didn’t turn out so great, and you’ll never see it, unless maybe you’re one of my kids sorting my stuff after I die.

Sometimes, I know that a painting or a drawing is bad, and I won’t show it.  Other times I have trouble being objective about my own work.  At those times, I try to think like Warhol.  Let everyone else decide if it’s good.  While they are deciding, I’ll just keep making even more art.

  1. From Steven Pressfield’s book, Turning Pro.

2. https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/507023-don-t-think-about-making-art-just-get-it-done-let

Facing the Jury

This oil pastel portrait, along with 2 more of my oil pastels will be on display at the KORE Gallery for the month of March.

Don’t worry.  I haven’t committed a crime or anything like that, but sometimes, artists have to submit their artwork to to be judged by a group of jurors, and either we are judged to be at a level of accomplishment that warrants a title “juried member” or gets us into a show, or we remain in a not-yet-juried position, when it comes to joining certain groups of artists.

I am still learning about all of this, so I thought some of you might find it interesting as well.  Artists face a lot of rejection as we enter juried shows and try for various opportunities that come our way.  I’m learning to accept rejection as part of the artist’s life; but I am relieved and excited to share that I made it through the jury process of the Louisville Artisans Guild, and therefore was invited to show my work at the KORE Gallery in downtown Louisville, along with  the other new juried members of the guild, during the month of March, with the opening reception happening this Saturday, from 6-8:30pm.  Hope you can come join us!