Tag Archives: Burkina Faso

This Artist’s Life, #11: Inspiration from Fellow Artists

This is one of the few animal paintings I’ve created. I’m now inspired to try more animals. We saw this young boy relaxing with his donkey as we traveled through Burkina Faso. 30 x 20 inches, Oil pastel on mat board, by Susan E. Brooks

Open Studio Weekend is an event sponsored by LVA, Louisville Visual Art, and by the University of Louisville Hite Art Institute in Louisville, Kentucky.  During this special weekend, scores of artists around town open their studios to the public, and LVA sells tickets with maps and information about all of the studios.  I did not sign up as an artist this year; instead, I enjoyed visiting the studios of fellow artists. It was an inspiring weekend for me.

The first artist we visited was Helen Merrick.  Helen uses bright colors to paint just about any subject you can imagine.  Helen inspired me to think about painting subjects that I don’t usually paint, such as animals or historic sites, and to try different mediums, such a watercolors or alcohol inks.  Thank you, Helen!

The next artist we visited was Anne MacCracken Borders.  She showed me that  I could open up my back porch studio area to visitors, and reminded me that I have traveled to many interesting places around the world that I could paint.  I will be digging into my travel photos soon!  Thank you, Anne.

On Sunday I stopped at KORE Gallery to hang out, both as an artist and as a visitor to my gallery owner’s studio.  I had never taken in Don Cartwright’s studio, which is filled with beautiful abstract paintings.  Abstract painting has not been my purview, but sometimes I feel that it takes more creativity than working from life or photos.  Thanks, Don, for sharing your creative imagination with us through your painting.

Our last stop on the Open Studio tour was at Debra Lott’s studio.  I love her colorful, haunting, floating figure paintings and portraits! She inspired me to think about how I can communicate powerful messages and advocate for justice with my art.  Thank you, Debra.

Thank you, LVA and  U of L Hite Art Institute for a great weekend of art!  Perhaps I will invite you all to my place next year.  Meanwhile, here’s my next big event:

Solo Show of Oil Pastel Portraits in July, 2018

Tanzanian Chidren, 16 x 20, oil pastel on paper, by Susan E. Brooks

A Celebration of Color: Oil Pastel Portraits by Susan E. Brooks will be on display at the Open Community Arts Center from July 2 – July 27, with the closing reception on July 27 from 6-9pm.  The show is comprised of 16 oil pastel portraits completed within the past two years, including the very recent works created for the “KRM We Create” events for the World Refugee week Festival in June.  Ten of the 16 artworks are available for purchase.  Come out and  see the work, and if you would like to meet me there, let me know!

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A Boy and His Donkey: the Story behind the Painting

We saw this young boy relaxing with his donkey as we traveled through Burkina Faso. Oil pastel on mat board, by Susan E. Brooks
We saw this young boy relaxing with his donkey as we traveled through Burkina Faso. Oil pastel on mat board, by Susan E. Brooks

 

It was one of the most difficult trips I’ve ever taken.  We were traveling through Burkina Faso during our missionary days, and the poverty was overwhelming.  I found myself, once again, the spoiled, picky, American girl who had trouble eating what the locals would have been thrilled to have.  One time at a restaurant, flies were swarming so thickly upon our plates of chicken and french fries that the only way we could  eat was to cover our plates completely with napkins,  pulling a fry or a piece of chicken out from under it the best we could.  I’ve never seen anything like it before or since.

Speaking of flies, the donkey that I painted above had flies crawling all over his eyes that were swollen shut.  They looked like two slits– they must have been infected.  I had to use my artistic skills to open his eyes and make him look healthy and happy.  The boy also was not as healthy and glowing as I painted him to be.  The truth is that I had to change the sad realities of this boy’s life in order to create a beautiful painting that people would want to see.  I’m not sure what to do with that, and I am ashamed to complain about flies on my fries when so many in that country had so  little to eat.

How do we respond to the stark contrasts and overwhelming misery that exist in our world?  How can we help?  Guilt and shame are not the answer.  The answer is probably different for each one of us.  If only painting away the infections and the hunger would make them disappear.  I don’t know how to fix our broken world, but I do see people helping, one person at a time.  Thank you, all of you who are loving, serving, and helping, one person at a time. God sees you.

 

 

 

Saying Goodbye to a Dear Friend

Burkina girl - oil pastel
Burkina girl – oil pastel

Selling an original painting is like saying goodbye to a dear friend.  Recently I sold this oil pastel of a young girl we encountered while traveling from Burkina Faso to Niger back in 2005.  The buyer is a complete stranger from a far away state who came across the painting in my Etsy shop, but I was happy to hear that she had actually traveled to the region, and has a heart for the children of the area.  I feel that God used the internet and my artwork to connect us– two people who have never met, and probably never will.  A part of me, an intangible part that is colors and marks and feelings that are uniquely mine,  will dwell with her family now, blessing that family, I pray, as I was blessed to see the beauty and the image of God in the young girl at the border of Burkina Faso and Niger.