Tag Archives: fine art

Mozambican Odyssey (an Excerpt)

“All the World” by Susan E. Brooks, 20 x 30 inches, oil pastel on mat board

 

Every day is filled with incredible stress, guilt, and fear.  My husband nearly died from an unidentified illness, and I fear for the health and safety of my kids almost all day, every day.  It’s easier just to stay on the compound with the other American missionaries, but that’s not why I came.  God, help me get through this.

The women here are so strong and persevering.  They work incredibly hard everyday, many with absent husbands, caring for children in addition to working a job if they can find one.  Most prepare their food over a fire and carry water some distance from a pump.  Their lives seem like constant struggle and pain to me, and yet they sing and smile and are so beautiful in their laughter.

I am a pampered child who cannot handle much stress, apparently.  Many days I wonder what it would be like to have a nervous breakdown.  How can you tell if you’re about to lose it?  What are the signs?  I can’t talk to anyone about this because they’re all stressed too, and I’m supposed to be a hero to the people back home.  What a crock!  I’m a wreck.  The kids are the only ones who seem to be okay, most of the time.  I try to hold it together for them.  I keep my  inner turmoil  hidden.  God does help me and carry me through, but I wonder if He will keep us safe.  I wonder if all 5 of us will make it back home to Kentucky.

I know that God is good.  I see it in nature and in the beauty of children and in the Mozambican people all around me.  How can the creator of such beauty not be good?  But I also see the suffering around me.  Children are dying from cholera all around.  I saw my 20 year old brother suffer and die of cancer within a few months.  My dad died at age 63, just before retirement, as a result of a car wreck.  Life is suffering, beauty, and glory, all mixed together.  Sometimes I could hide from that back in Kentucky, but not here in Mozambique.  Extreme poverty slaps you in the face as children beg for bread every day; but at night, the stars crowding the sky seem so close you could throw a rock at one and send it crashing down to earth.   This beauty is also undeniable.

Looking back in 2019, I did survive 3 years in Mozambique, but one of my teammates did not.  He was shot and killed by armed robbers that entered our compound one night.  I did not feel free to write about how difficult it was for me back then, but now I am free of the pedestal and the expectations that were put upon me at the time.  I don’t know why I am safely back home, and my friend is not.  God allows suffering, and He is is good.  These truths I have to hold in tension, and probably always will.  I hope I can live in such a way as to celebrate the beauty and goodness, and at the same time, maybe I can alleviate a little of the suffering, or at least, stand in solidarity with those who suffer, as Jesus does.

Facing the Jury

This oil pastel portrait, along with 2 more of my oil pastels will be on display at the KORE Gallery for the month of March.

Don’t worry.  I haven’t committed a crime or anything like that, but sometimes, artists have to submit their artwork to to be judged by a group of jurors, and either we are judged to be at a level of accomplishment that warrants a title “juried member” or gets us into a show, or we remain in a not-yet-juried position, when it comes to joining certain groups of artists.

I am still learning about all of this, so I thought some of you might find it interesting as well.  Artists face a lot of rejection as we enter juried shows and try for various opportunities that come our way.  I’m learning to accept rejection as part of the artist’s life; but I am relieved and excited to share that I made it through the jury process of the Louisville Artisans Guild, and therefore was invited to show my work at the KORE Gallery in downtown Louisville, along with  the other new juried members of the guild, during the month of March, with the opening reception happening this Saturday, from 6-8:30pm.  Hope you can come join us!

Sacred Places

Sacred Places,  Oil pastel on paper, 18×24 inches, by Susan E. Brooks

Sometimes–no, all the time–I want be aware of the sacred all around me.  We tend to separate life into categories: sacred versus secular, art versus life, one category or discipline versus another, and we seldom connect things in our minds.  Yet, in reality, it is all connected.  Academic disciplines overlap, art influences life, and all of creation is sacred.

My art grows out of special times when my eyes are opened to beauty, which for me is a gift from God.  The above pastel painting was inspired by a time when the sacred danced into my ordinary day, and demanded my attention.

It was one of many summer days that I kept my granddaughters, who, though they look like little angels, do not always behave like angels.  We went out into the backyard to play, and the sun was streaming long yellow-green stripes of light across the grass, and these tiny yellow flowers were shooting up straight and thin, up to the blue-violet sky, and the tulip tree was spreading its delicate, pale pink blossoms.

The invitation to bask in the glory of the moment was not lost on the girls, who  ran to gather the tiny yellow flowers for their mommy.   It struck me that this was a sacred, beautiful moment, and though I was tired, this time I noticed, and I started taking photos.

How many times have I not noticed and just kept pushing through my day?  Too many, I’m afraid.  This year, open my eyes, God, to more and more of the beautiful and sacred around me, and help me listen and see You at work in all of this painful, yet glorious existence.

KRM We Create Art Events during the World Refugee Festival

“Not Wretched, Not Refuse, but Welcome,” was created for the KRM We Create Events in honor of World Refugee Week, The title is based on the poem that hangs on the Statue of Liberty, and the words in the trees are also taken from that poem, “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus.

I am excited to be a part of the World Refugee Festival in Louisville  beginning June 16 – 24!  Kentucky Refugee ministries has organized a series of art events in celebration of World Refugee Week.  The purpose of the events is to celebrate the refugees that have come to Louisville and the blessings they bring to us as a community.  The piece pictured above is fairly large, and it is one thing to view art online, but quite another to stand in front of an original  work of art.  Online you cannot experience the intensity of colors or the interplay of the various textures and strokes in a drawing or painting as you can seeing it “face to face.”  So I hope you come out tomorrow to the Better Block Festival and to the Brown Theatre next Saturday, June 23.  See you there!

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A Boy and His Donkey: the Story behind the Painting

We saw this young boy relaxing with his donkey as we traveled through Burkina Faso. Oil pastel on mat board, by Susan E. Brooks
We saw this young boy relaxing with his donkey as we traveled through Burkina Faso. Oil pastel on mat board, by Susan E. Brooks

 

It was one of the most difficult trips I’ve ever taken.  We were traveling through Burkina Faso during our missionary days, and the poverty was overwhelming.  I found myself, once again, the spoiled, picky, American girl who had trouble eating what the locals would have been thrilled to have.  One time at a restaurant, flies were swarming so thickly upon our plates of chicken and french fries that the only way we could  eat was to cover our plates completely with napkins,  pulling a fry or a piece of chicken out from under it the best we could.  I’ve never seen anything like it before or since.

Speaking of flies, the donkey that I painted above had flies crawling all over his eyes that were swollen shut.  They looked like two slits– they must have been infected.  I had to use my artistic skills to open his eyes and make him look healthy and happy.  The boy also was not as healthy and glowing as I painted him to be.  The truth is that I had to change the sad realities of this boy’s life in order to create a beautiful painting that people would want to see.  I’m not sure what to do with that, and I am ashamed to complain about flies on my fries when so many in that country had so  little to eat.

How do we respond to the stark contrasts and overwhelming misery that exist in our world?  How can we help?  Guilt and shame are not the answer.  The answer is probably different for each one of us.  If only painting away the infections and the hunger would make them disappear.  I don’t know how to fix our broken world, but I do see people helping, one person at a time.  Thank you, all of you who are loving, serving, and helping, one person at a time. God sees you.