Tag Archives: KORE Gallery

Mozambican Odyssey: Babies Carrying Babies (Excerpt #4)

In Mozambique, it was not unusual to see toddlers carrying babies on their backs.

Lately I’ve been going through old photos from our time in Mozambique.  The photo that this artwork is based on reminded me of an eye-opening experience I had after we first moved to Mozambique, when my daughter was only 3 or 4 years old.  We had hired a young mother to help me with the housework and with learning the language and culture.  One day she needed to bring her children to work with her, and she brought her little daughter who was the same age as ours, 3 or 4, but strapped onto the little one’s back was a baby!  That little one, very much a baby herself, I thought, was expected to bounce that baby and keep her happy while her mommy worked.  I couldn’t believe it.  I watched as she entered my house, carrying that heavy load, and I worried about the little head bobbing up and down as big sis–tiny big sis– carried her around.  The little girl walked through the kitchen, and then she caught sight of my daughter’s bedroom.

At this point I feel the need to say that my kids left so many of their toys behind in the states, and there was very little around Maputo that we could afford to buy for them, or even that they would want when we first moved there.   Hannah did not have very many toys compared to her friends back in the states.  But when that little toddler entered her room, still with the baby on her back, her eyes got huge!  It was as if she had walked into Disneyland.  She had apparently never seen so many little girl toys, baby dolls, etc., and she just wanted to play in there all day.  That she did, as I recall, occasionally stopping to comfort her in-the-flesh baby sister on her back, as she played with the dolls.

It was another of many such moments in which I realized that I was the rich white American, and my employee’s kids could not imagine living like we did, despite the fact that we felt we had given up so much to move to Mozambique.

I’ve been processing this stuff for years, and I still don’t have many answers.  Being ashamed of having more than someone else is not helpful, but I do think we need to struggle with what can be done about income inequality and find ways to be compassionate.

Micah 6 : 8 comes to mind.  “And what  does the Lord require of you?  To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

I need to be concerned with justice, mercy, and humility.  These three are so needed, now more than ever.

Facing the Jury

This oil pastel portrait, along with 2 more of my oil pastels will be on display at the KORE Gallery for the month of March.

Don’t worry.  I haven’t committed a crime or anything like that, but sometimes, artists have to submit their artwork to to be judged by a group of jurors, and either we are judged to be at a level of accomplishment that warrants a title “juried member” or gets us into a show, or we remain in a not-yet-juried position, when it comes to joining certain groups of artists.

I am still learning about all of this, so I thought some of you might find it interesting as well.  Artists face a lot of rejection as we enter juried shows and try for various opportunities that come our way.  I’m learning to accept rejection as part of the artist’s life; but I am relieved and excited to share that I made it through the jury process of the Louisville Artisans Guild, and therefore was invited to show my work at the KORE Gallery in downtown Louisville, along with  the other new juried members of the guild, during the month of March, with the opening reception happening this Saturday, from 6-8:30pm.  Hope you can come join us!