Tag Archives: values

Mozambican Odyssey, #7: Chongololo Racing

Our son Kirk, back in 1996, being friendly with an African Giant Millipede.

Chongololo Races

(from an email dated Dec. 21, 1996)

Kids are so creative.  It’s our first Christmas away from the states. It is not like any other Christmas we have ever had, but the kids are enjoying the little things, like  Chongololo races.  A Chongololo is an African giant black millipede that our boys find in abundance around our house.  I am not exaggerating when I use the word “giant.”  They are sometimes as long as 15 inches, and they are the world’s largest millipede.

The other day the boys made tracks in the sand and had Chongololo races. I keep my distance from any millipede, no matter how friendly he seems, but I am happy that they have found a way to entertain themselves.  Who needs television or store-bought toys?

Our son Joseph in 1996, playing with a chongololo.

Now in 2019, as I was looking up how to spell Chongololo, I discovered that the term “Chongololo” has been used as a derogatory term for a person who is obsessed with Western culture. (from https://masukam.blogspot.com/2014/05/are-you-chongololo.html)  “Chongololo Races,” takes on a new meaning when I think about it that way.  You’ve heard of the race to “keep up with the Jones.”  How about the race to keep up with Western culture?  Let’s call it “Chongololo racing.”  Many things about Western culture are good and I am thankful, but maybe we should stop  racing each other to have everything the culture suggests that we “need.”  Maybe we could learn a few things from Eastern culture, such as taking time for family and the people in our lives, and slowing down instead of “racing” around all the time.  Think about it.  Chongololo racing.

Update on My Children’s Books

Reading with Poppy
Reading with Poppy, oil pastel painting by Susan E. Brooks. Prints available at https://fineartamerica.com/featured/reading-with-poppy-susan-e-brooks.html

When God invented grandchildren, He outdid himself — forgive me, but all of you grandparents know what I mean.  I couldn’t be more crazy about mine!  They have changed my life forever, as a matter of fact, because I wanted to write books for them.  After writing books for them, I was able to get a paid writing job for a local children’s book publisher.  One good thing led to another, and I have my amazing grandchildren to thank.

Just recently, the company that will be publishing my book later this summer was featured in Insider Louisville Magazine.  Here’s a link to that article https://insiderlouisville.com/lifestyle_culture/louisville-based-baxters-corner-creates-fun-interactive-childrens-books/.  Baxter’s Corner is a great local company that is focused on creating children’s books that promote healthy values.

Meanwhile, I’m working on writing and illustrating the third book inspired by my grandchildren, which is a surprise that cannot be revealed until it’s finished.  If you’re interested in seeing the first two books, go to http://www.lulu.com/shop/susan-e-brooks/ariel-princess-of-the-forest-mischievous-cheetah/hardcover/product-21832502.html.

 

Celebrating a First

This is the cover art for my book, Ariel, Princess of the Forest, Oil Pastel on paper
This is the cover art for my book, Ariel, Princess of the Forest, Oil Pastel on paper

In recent years especially, I have felt almost a burning desire to write–about my life, about my thoughts, about funny and interesting things that happen at my job, about the goodness of God, about experiences with internationals–stories slap me in the face nearly everyday and demand to be written!  Writing for me is a wonderful way to really savor your life, to be able to live the fun parts over and over again, and even to invent some fun in your mind if you’re running a little short.

In the summer of 2014, I was inspired to write and illustrate a children’s book for my granddaughter.  That was way more work than I ever imagined, but I also found that something intuitive or imaginative happened when I started to write: the story took a direction I never thought of in the beginning, ideas sprang out of nowhere, and the creative process, a mystery to me, made writing that book,  Ariel, Princess of the Forest, an adventure. 

I figured out how to publish it with an online company called lulu.com.  Presenting the book to my granddaughter and her parents and seeing her giggle about the illustrations of her favorite stuffed animal going wild,  was about as good as life gets for a grandmother.

Once I started for one grandchild, I was committed.  Apparently my children think I need to keep busy, because they’ve since added two more grandchildren to the count, for a grand total of six children’s books due so far!

The next summer I created a book for my grandson, Joshua’s Journey: The Secret of the Chameleon, loosely based on an experience our family had in Mozambique.  After going through the grueling work of self-publishing again, I decided that it would be nice to find a publisher.

One thing led to another, and thanks to a sweet friend pushing me to go to a writer’s meeting, I made some connections with a local publisher.  The publisher wasn’t ready to republish my books, but she was impressed with them, and decided to hire me to write for her children’s book series!

I have just completed my first book for Baxter’s Corner publishing company!  Baxter’s Corner’s goal is to create books that will teach  healthy values.  They hired me to write about one of their characters, Ellema the elephant.  Ellema and the Big Rig will be published early next year.  Baxter’s Corner already has an established illustrator for the series, Mary Ellen Stottmann, so I was hired only for the writing.  I appreciated working with the “Chief Pencil,” author and editor Linda Baker.  By the time my third and final draft was accepted, I was relieved, happy, and ready to do my victory dance!  I was paid to write!  A dream come true!  God is so good!